From the University of Virginia:
 
"As part of the photosynthesis process algae produce oil and can generate 15 times more oil per acre than other plants used for biofuels, such as corn and switchgrass. Algae can grow in salt water, freshwater or even contaminated water, at sea or in ponds, and on land not suitable for food production.

On top of those advantages, algae — at least in theory — should grow even better when fed extra carbon dioxide (the main greenhouse gas) and organic material like sewage. If so, algae could produce biofuel while cleaning up other problems."
 
As we've been saying, couple some bio-reactors to the flues of coal-to-liquid conversion plants where the appropriate coal conversion technologies have been installed and additional raw material for the conversion process can be grown on site - all while protecting the environment.
 
Joe the Miner

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