Method of making ceramic products

In addition to it's long-known utility as a raw material in the making of Portland-type Cement, PC; and, as a reactive fine aggregate for that PC to make a better-performing Portland-type Cement Concrete; Coal Ash also has a long track record as a raw material in the making of fired Ceramics, as a replacement for at least some of the other mineral raw materials, typically one sort of clay, or clay mineral, or another, with attendant economies related to avoided costs of excavating those raw materials and disposal costs for the Ash.

Among our reports concerning such potentials, keeping in mind that kiln-fired clay bricks do, indeed, qualify as Ceramics, have been:

West Virginia Coal Association | Coal Ash Makes Better Bricks | Research & Development; concerning:

"US Patent Application 20120031306 - Bricks and Method of Forming Bricks with High Coal Ash Content;

United States Patent: 8313634

First, up front, we herein again confirm that Carbon Dioxide, as it arises in only a small way, relative to natural sources of emission, such as volcanoes, from our economically essential use of Coal in the generation of abundant and truly economical electric power, is a valuable raw material resource.

We can reclaim Carbon Dioxide, from whatever convenient source, and then convert that CO2 on a practical basis into a variety of commercially important compounds, including fuel alcohols and hydrocarbons.

In a recent dispatch, now accessible via:

West Virginia Coal Association | Saudi Arabia and Texas CO2 to Hydrocarbon Syngas | Research & Development; we made report of:

"United States Patent 8,288,446 - Catalytic Hydrogenation of CO2 into Syngas Mixture; October 16, 2012; Assignee: Saudi Basic Industries Corporation, Riyadh; Abstract: The invention relates to a process of making a syngas mixture containing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, comprising a step of contacting a gaseous feed mixture containing carbon dioxide and hydrogen with a catalyst, wherein the catalyst substantially consists of chromia/alumina. This process enables hydrogenation of carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide with high selectivity, and good catalyst stability over time and under variations in processing conditions. The process can be applied separately, but can also be combined with other processes, for example up-stream with other synthesis processes for making products like aliphatic oxygenates, olefins or aromatics".

EP2008005069 CATALYTIC HYDROGENATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE INTO SYNGAS MIXTURE

In a recent dispatch, accessible via:

West Virginia Coal Association | Saudi Arabia and Texas CO2 to Hydrocarbon Syngas | Research & Development;

we made report of:

"United States Patent 8,288,446 - Catalytic Hydrogenation of CO2 into Syngas Mixture; October 16, 2012; Inventors: Agaddin Mamedov, Texas, and Abdulaziz Al-Jodai, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Assignee: Saudi Basic Industries Corporation, Riyadh; Abstract: The invention relates to a process of making a syngas mixture containing hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, comprising a step of contacting a gaseous feed mixture containing carbon dioxide and hydrogen with a catalyst, wherein the catalyst substantially consists of chromia/alumina. This process enables hydrogenation of carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide with high selectivity, and good catalyst stability over time and under variations in processing conditions. The process can be applied separately, but can also be combined with other processes, for example up-stream with other synthesis processes for making products like aliphatic oxygenates, olefins or aromatics".

http://www.flyash.info/2011/047-Itskos-2011.pdf

We've documented a couple of times that Coal Ash can be beneficially utilized in the making of what are known as "Metal Matrix Composites"; that is, a metal object wherein the metal is "filled" or "loaded" with a non-metal material that serves to impart desired properties in the finished product.

A number of metals are posited to be suitable for the manufacture of such composites, although Aluminum is the one we've seen most often described, as in our recent report of:

West Virginia Coal Association | Coal Ash & Metal Composites Save Gas, Reduce CO2 | Research & Development; concerning: "Aluminum - Fly Ash Metal Matrix Composites as Advanced Automobile Material; 2001' Cosponsors: United States Department of Energy; Wisconsin Electric Power Company; Electric Power Research Institute; Report Summary: Metal matrix composites such as silicon carbide-aluminum, alumina-aluminum and graphite-aluminum represent a class of emerging materials with significant potential for commercial use in the auto and aerospace industries. In industrial foundry trials, a joint industry and Department of Energy project demonstrated a promising new process for producing a low cost aluminum metal matrix composite containing fly ash particles".

GB2010051733 PROCESS FOR PRODUCING METHANOL

To get it out of the way, right up front, "The University of Oxford" in our headline is the real deal.

It is, in other words, most definitely not the "Ox Ford" alma mater claimed by someone who might be more familiar to many of our older US Coal Country readers: Jethro Bodine.

That bit of allusion to Americana aside, The University of Oxford was founded in England all the way back around the year 1100; and, it is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. More about it can, almost of course, be learned via:

University of Oxford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.


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