United States Patent: 4693883

As we've previously explained and documented, indirect processes for the conversion of Coal, into more versatile hydrocarbons, entail an initial gasification of the Coal, which forms the Hydrogen-Carbon Monoxide mixture known as synthesis gas, or "syngas"; which gas mixture is then catalytically condensed, via a number of processes that are well-known and well-established in the petroleum industry, and made thereby to form gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons.

Such gasification of Coal is actually a controlled oxidation process; a limited "burning" of it, with a reduced amount of Oxygen, so that the more reactive Carbon Monoxide is formed preferentially to Carbon Dioxide.

 

Energy Citations Database (ECD) - - Document #896673

Well more than a year ago, we made report of USDOE-financed Carbon Dioxide recycling developments, targeted on the production of the nearly-precious Methanol that had been undertaken for the USDOE by Ohio's University of Akron.

In that report, USDOE/Akron Recycle CO2 | Research & Development, we were taught by the University that we could, as a result of their work under USDOE Contract DE-FG26-99FT40579, which ended October, 2001, use renewable energy resources to collect Carbon Dioxide and then productively convert it, recycle it, into Methanol.

 

United States Patent: 4390409

Without linking to any prior reports, we've earlier documented that Big Oil has known, for many, many decades, how to quietly go about liquefying and refining a carbonaceous material that is, except for already being pretty much ground up, wet and sloppy, or, even a semi-solid tar, is, just as is Athabascan tar sand bitumen, very much like Coal.

"Petroleum refinery residuals", or "residual oil", or, often, just "resids" are the heavy carbonaceous leftovers remaining, after the easier-to-process, and thus more profitable, distillates are extracted from crude petroleum.

 

Patent US3577337

We've many times documented the extensive Coal liquefaction technologies that had been developed, over the course of multiple decades, by the old US Bureau of Mines outpost in Pittsburgh, PA; a facility that is now a component of the US Department of Energy.

We have also, from various sources, documented that different kinds of energy, including Solar light and heat, microwaves; and, electricity, as generated from any economical source, can be used to facilitate the conversion of Coal, and especially of Coal-Water and/or Coal-Oil mixtures, or "slurries", into more versatile hydrocarbons.

 

United States Patent: 4390409

Without linking to any prior reports, we've earlier documented that Big Oil has known, for many, many decades, how to quietly go about liquefying and refining a carbonaceous material that is, except for already being pretty much ground up, wet and sloppy, or, even a semi-solid tar, is, just as is Athabascan tar sand bitumen, very much like Coal.

"Petroleum refinery residuals", or "residual oil", or, often, just "resids" are the heavy carbonaceous leftovers remaining, after the easier-to-process, and thus more profitable, distillates are extracted from crude petroleum.

 


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